New report shows wildlife crime in Bolivia and Suriname poses serious threat to indigenous species

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New report shows wildlife crime in Bolivia and Suriname poses serious threat to indigenous species

22 January 2019
News
Wildlife poaching and trafficking pose a serious threat to unique species in the Amazon countries of Bolivia and Suriname, according to a new study commissioned by IUCN National Committee of The Netherlands.

The species most targeted are jaguars, birds and reptiles, sea turtles and a range of animals that are killed for human consumption (bushmeat). According to the study, this illegal wildlife trade is fuelled by major infrastructure development. 

“Until recently, very little was known about wildlife poaching and trafficking in Bolivia and Suriname”, says Liliana Jauregui from IUCN NL. “This report aimed to fill this critical gap. For the first time, we have an assessment that helps us understand the threats and provides clues on how to tackle the illegal trade.”

The report identifies jaguar poaching, illegal pet trade and illegal bushmeat trade as key wildlife crime issues for both countries. In Suriname, the poaching of sea turtle eggs, which are considered a delicacy, poses an additional threat.