Animal suffering and the marketing tactics behind the European fur trade revealed in new report

#Act4
Wildlife

Animal suffering and the marketing tactics behind the European fur trade revealed in new report

13 October 2015
Eurogroup for Animals
News
The claim of high ethical standards made by the European fur trade are in stark contrast to the reality in fur farms and criticised by animal welfare experts, according to the new report “Nordic fur trade – marketed as responsible business”.

The report will be launched in the European Parliament on October 15. The claim of high ethical standards made by the European fur trade are in stark contrast to the reality in fur farms and criticised by animal welfare experts, according to the new report “Nordic fur trade – marketed as responsible business”. The report will be launched in the European Parliament on October 15.

The Nordic countries, in particular, have been branding their fur industry as being ethical in terms of animal welfare. Especially the Scandinavian company Saga Furs is using strategies as “ethical branding”. Yet the new report about the Nordic fur trade reveals how conditions for the animals on Nordic fur farms are not significantly different from the conditions on fur farms in other parts of the world.

“Fur farming and its animal welfare problems are the same everywhere, in Finland as well as in Denmark and China. Active predators such as minks and foxes, the main species reared on fur farms, are kept in long rows of battery wire mesh cages where their behavioural needs cannot be met”, says Salla Tuomivaara, co-author and Director for the Finnish NGO Animalia.

The launch of the new critical fur report is timely, as the fur industry only two weeks ago had an exhibition in the European Parliament, promoting its animal welfare scheme. According to the report, Saga Furs claims to be proud that their fur comes from countries enforcing fur-animal welfare legislation, “from closely monitored farms in the EU or Norway”.

“These animal welfare schemes are used as marketing instruments to create an impression of high animal welfare standards, when in reality Nordic fur farming is criticised by animal welfare experts even within its own countries”, says co-author and veterinarian Siri Martinsen, Director for the Norwegian NGO NOAH.

One of the conclusions of the report is that the company Saga Furs is to be regarded as a marketing campaign combating increasing ethical awareness in a Europe that is increasingly concerned about animal welfare.

The report “Nordic fur trade – marketed as responsible business” will be launched in the European Parliament, Brussels, on Thursday October 15, 13.00-14.00. Please note the new location: ASP 04F384. A sandwich lunch is served from 12.30.

The launch is arranged by international animal advocacy coalitions Fur Free Alliance and Eurogroup for Animals.

Contact:

Salla Tuomivaara, co-author, Director Animalia, +358 5054 46 716 salla.tuomivaara@animalia.fi

Camilla Björkbom, project leader, Fur Free Alliance and Eurogroup for Animals, +46 70 483 57 98, c.bjorkbom@eurogroupforanimals.org

Fur farming and its animal welfare problems are the same everywhere, in Finland as well as in Denmark and China. Active predators such as minks and foxes, the main species reared on fur farms, are kept in long rows of battery wire mesh cages where their behavioural needs cannot be met.
Salla Tuomivaara, Director at Animalia