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Annual Report 2015

Political Advocacy
Annual Report

Summary of Eurogroup for Animals' activity in 2015.

Memorandum on Animal Welfare Related Policies to the Slovakian Presidency of the Council of the EU

Political Advocacy
Position Paper

Eurogroup for Animals, the leading pan-European animal advocacy organisation, would like to present the Slovakian Presidency of the Council of the EU with its key concerns during their forthcoming Presidency. A number of developments are on the agenda that will have significant impact on animal welfare and we trust that the Presidency will use our input and positions as set out in this document to ensure that they work to accommodate and protect animals and their welfare.

Animals used in science, testing and education

Animals in Science
Position Paper

Eurogroup is opposed to the use of animals in science, testing and education which causes animals pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm. Our definition of ‘animal’ includes foetal, embryonic and larval forms.
Our primary goal is to end the use of animals for science, testing and educational purposes, by replacing them with humane alternatives. We strive for a paradigm shift in society, politics and academia towards a humane, modern and animal-free research and regulatory approach. We are convinced that much greater effort can and must be made to develop, accept, implement and promote experimental and test methods and approaches that either replace or avoid animal use.

Removing the Blinkers: The Health and Welfare of European Equidae in 2015

Equines
Report

Equidae in 21st century Europe play a myriad of roles - they are perhaps the most versatile animals humans have domesticated. While this diversity of use has ensured that equidae have remained close to humans, it has also created problems when seeking protection for them in law. This report aims to give a snapshot of equidae and the equine sector in the EU in 2015, uncover welfare problems, analyse the legislation currently in place affecting them, and recommend how legislation can better protect these animals.

Think Positive: Why Europe Needs 'Positive Lists' to Regulate the Sale and Keeping of Exotic Animals as Pets

Wildlife
Brochure

There are more than 200 million pets in Europe, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians. However, many species, especially exotic animals, are unsuited to a life in captivity. This may result in severe animal welfare problems, and can also be detrimental to biodiversity, have a negative impact on public health, and present a danger to the health of other animals. Therefore, the impacts of keeping exotic pets can have high costs across many sectors. Rescue centres are increasingly confronted on a daily basis with the problems that stem from this trade. Owners may no longer want their pet because it was an unsuitable match from an impulsive and poorly-informed purchase. There are several ways to regulate the keeping and sale of exotic pets, but a Positive List (a list of allowed species) is the most effective, concise, transparent, enforceable and economically feasible way.

2010 Areas of Concern

Political Advocacy
Report

This document covers the main areas of concern for animal welfare. It aims to provide a better understanding of each topic from different viewpoints: economic; consumer; welfare problems; existing legislation at European and national level and finally what can realistically be done to improve the situation. It is not intended to be exhaustive but used as a practical reference document, providing updates on a wide range of animal welfare issues which can be regulated at EU level.

Genetic manipulation of animals in research

Animals in Science
Position Paper

Genetic manipulation involves the deliberate modification of the genome - the material responsible for inherited characteristics. There are specific welfare concerns associated with genetic modification of animals. The crossing of boundaries between species and the interference with the genetic integrity of animals has also evoked strong moral objections.

Laboratory use of genetically modified (GM) animals continues to increase dramatically. Within the EU, statistical comparison of figures of GM animal use is not available, but where GM animals are listed by member states they are generally increasing. For example, in Sweden a recent 27,000 increase in the number of mice used is attributed to increase in genetic modification and in the UK GM animals now count for one quarter of all procedures .

In the field of biotechnology the pace of scientific development often outstrips meaningful ethical debate and Eurogroup is extremely concerned about the ethical and welfare implications of the use of biotechnology techniques on animals.